Diversity/Race

Separate, But Equal

Based upon the acclaimed book he co-authored, Separate, But Equal: The Mississippi Photographs of Henry Clay Anderson, filmmaker Shawn D. Wilson’s documentary explores the all black, separate-but-equal town of Greenville, MS in the 1950s-60s, and asks a most provocative question about desegregation: “Did we lose more than we gained?”

William Lobdell

William Lobdell

Award-winning former LA Times journalist, and author of the memoir Losing My Religion: How I Lost My Faith Reporting on Religion in America, Lobdell shares his spiritual journey investigating and reconciling the many oft-conflicting facets of faith in America, which took him from evangelical Christian to reluctant atheist.

Joan Garry

Joan Garry

Former Executive Director of GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation), Garry is widely recognized as one of the most vocal, passionate and effective civil rights leaders in America. She is a featured blogger at The Huffington Post, and frequently contributes commentary to major news publications and TV networks.

John Bowe

John Bowe

Award-winning New Yorker journalist and author of Pulitzer Prize nominee Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy, Bowe examines how outsourcing, subcontracting, immigration fraud, and the relentless pursuit of “everyday low prices” have created a frightening new market for slavery in America.

William C. Rhoden

William C. Rhoden

Award-winning New York Times columnist, bestselling author of Forty Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall and Redemption of the Black Athlete, and frequent guest on ESPN’s “The Sports Reporters,” Rhoden uses the metaphors of sports to address crucial issues and conflicts in contemporary American society.

Valerie Boyd

Valerie Boyd

Award-winning author of the acclaimed biography Wrapped in Rainbows: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston, and the forthcoming Spirits in the Dark: The Untold Story of Black Women in Hollywood — a groundbreaking study tracing the history of black women in film and TV from the 1920s to the present.

Gustavo Arellano

Gustavo Arellano

Author of the bestselling book and nationally syndicated column ¡Ask a Mexican!, and Orange County: A Personal History, Arellano, also a contributing editor to the LA Times, addresses immigration, integration and the role of stereotypes in American society, and helps organizations to better connect with Latinos.